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Pioneering the Industry

Over the past 37 years, Vestas has continuously pioneered new technologies and solutions that have allowed us, together with our customers, to bring reliable wind energy solutions to 75 countries worldwide, thus planting the seeds of the modern wind industry.

Every single project represents a journey in itself, helping us to mature the capabilities and know-how that we offer today to our business partners in order to widen wind energy’s footprint across new territories.

Our stories are testament to the fact that there are no obstacles impossible to overcome when you have a solid partner with the right capabilities, accompanied by an industry-leading products and service portfolio. Indeed, like all good partners, we want to make this journey together with you, sharing our knowledge and answering your questions in order to fast-track your wind investment.

We invite you to travel through the years with us, as we showcase how we have succeeded in bringing renewable energy to over 30 markets.

1980-1989

Discover the markets we have pioneered over the years from 1980 until 1989. Read our stories from the first turbine installed in Mykonos, Greece to the first wind park installation in India.

    Close

    India 1986

    From the first installation to date, wind power in India has been a success story

    India is one of the countries in which wind energy has grown rapidly over the last three decades. Starting out in late 1970s with limited ideas in research and training, the wind energy business has progressed continuously throughout the years.

    The first wind turbine and wind farm in India was installed in 1986 in Mandvi, Gujarat. The joint venture between Gujarat Industrial Investment Corporation GIIC and Gujarat Electricity Board, which was taken over by Natural Energy Processing Company (NEPC) India in 1990, had partnered with Denmark’s MICON for two units of the M100 turbine, each with a capacity of 110 kW. This was the first wind turbine above 100 kW ever installed in India and also the first one to be connected to the grid. In 1989, the wind farm was extended using Micon turbines with different capacities. The total installed capacity of Mandvi wind farm reached 1.68 MW after the extension, and has been producing power ever since.

    In the same year, Vestas installed ten V16-55 kW wind turbines near Okha in Gujarat. This wind farm was developed by RRB Consultants and Engineers who went on to install a further two V16-55 kW wind power plants in India. In 1987, RRB and Vestas made a joint venture and set up a wind turbine factory in Chennai. By that stage, there were already four wind power plants and one wind turbine factory in India.

    Enhancing the performance of the wind power projects

    From the date the first wind turbine was installed to today, wind power in India proved to be a success story.The pace of this growth is due to new investments, thanks to the development of new technologies. By dedicating our business exclusively to wind energy, Vestas offers superior cost-effective wind technologies, products and services, together with our wide range of wind turbine options to mitigate risks and site restrictions.

    One of these options is relevant for climatic conditions such as those in India. Vestas' improved lightning protection can significantly reduce the risk of damage due to lightning strikes. Copper caps at the tips of the blades eliminate or significantly reduce costs for blade replacement or maintenance. Moreover, this option reduces turbine downtime caused by damaged blades and replacement or repair. Another option that helps increase customers’ return on investment is the Condition Monitoring System (CMS). This system analyses how your wind turbine is performing via a series of sensors, helping to reduce unscheduled maintenance, improving availability, reducing repair costs, planning repair logistics more efficiently, and adding value in the long-term.

    With increasing reliability and performance of its wind turbines, Vestas in India reached an installed capacity of approximately 2,5 GWs by the end of 2015.

     

     

     

    Turbine Facts

    Model:
    M100-110 kW

    Installation Date:
    January 1986

    Average MWh Per Year:
    455 MWh

    CO2 Saved Per Year:
    415 tonnes

    Capacity:
    0.2 MW

    Average Household Needs Covered:
    830 households

    Disclaimer:
    AEP figures are indicative only.

    Greece 1986

    Greek wind resources rival the most attractive in Europe: 8 metres/second and 2,500 equivalent hours in many parts of the country. 

    In 1986, the first wind turbine of Greece was installed on Mykonos island which marked the beginning of the development of wind energy in the country.

     

     

    Turbine Facts

    Model:
    M300-100 kW

    Installation Date:
    1986

    Capacity:
    0.1 MW

    China 1986

    In 1986 Vestas installed three turbines in Rongcheng, Shandong Province, marking the establishment of the first ever wind power plant in China. These turbines ran safely for 29 years until retirement in 2015. In 1999, the first Vestas office in Beijing was established, which is currently the headquarters of Vestas Asia Pacific and China and in 2005 Vestas began to build our largest integrated manufacturing complex in the world in Tianjin, producing generators, blades, nacelles and control systems.

     

    As of May 2016, Vestas has installed a total of 3,765 turbines in China. While China’s current installed wind power capacity is 145 GW, the country’s 13th Five Year Plan has set a goal of reaching cumulative installed capacity of 250 GW from wind power by 2020. With our unparalleled track record, industry-leading know-how and proven experience, we will continue to be reliable and trustworthy partners of Chinese customers.

     

    Turbine Facts

    Model:
    V15-55/11 kW

    Installation Date:
    1986

    Israel 1986

    On the outskirts of Kibbutz Ma'aleh Gilboa stands one Vestas turbine since 1996. The project was erected as a part of the Israeli national wind energy program. The Ministry of Energy supported the project with a grant of 30% of the total cost.

     

    The installation of the turbine speaks to Vestas’ capabilities in terms of project planning and installation. Capabilities that have now evolved into tools such as SiteHunt®, which is an advanced analytical platform which examines a broad spectrum of wind and weather data to evaluate potential sites and establish the optimal conditions for a wind project. Vestas’ capabilities in planning and installation allowed for the discovery of the turbine location to deliver on the best case scenario in terms of energy output.

     

    Turbine Facts

    Model:
    V23-200 kW

    Installation Date:
    1986

    Average MWh Per Year:
    851 MWh

    CO2 Saved Per Year:
    586 tonnes

    Capacity:
    0.2 MW

    Average Household Needs Covered:
    103 households

    Disclaimer:
    AEP figures are indicative only.

    Mauritius 1986

    An island situated in the southwest Indian Ocean, Mauritius faces increasing demand for energy.

     

     

    In 1986, the country set out to tackle this through wind energy. Continuing with this plan, the Republic launched in 2010 a policy to reduce its energy imports by developing the country's renewable energy sources.

    Turbine Facts

    Model:
    M300-100 kW

    Installation Date:
    1986

    Capacity:
    0.1 MW

    Disclaimer:
    AEP figures are indicative only.

    Montserrat 1989

    Montserrat’s dependence on imported diesel, from a single supplier, leaves it exposed to price hikes and fluctuations and the potential of supply disruption.

     

     

    The Caribbean island state has been toying with renewables since the 1980s and installed its first commercial turbine, a Vestas V20-100kW in June 1989. Two more 100kW Vestas turbines were later installed in 1991.

    Turbine Facts

    Model:
    V20-110 kW

    Installation Date:
    June 1989

    Average MWh Per Year:
    408 MWh

    CO2 Saved Per Year:
    77 tonnes

    Capacity:
    0.1 MW

    Average Household Needs Covered:
    185 households

    Disclaimer:
    AEP figures are indicative only.

    1990-1999

    Discover the markets we have pioneered over the years from 1990 until 1999.

      Close

      France 1991

      Vestas leads the French market since the beginning of wind energy

      Back in 1991, when wind power was not even close to what it is now, Vestas installed a V25-200 kW in Port-la-Nouvelle, a small coastal town in the French region of Aude. This was the first wind turbine to be connected to the grid in the country. At that time, even the shape of turbines was different to what we see today, with three 12-metre blades supported by a lattice tower that looked much like a small Tour Eiffel. This small turbine sparked an industry that has grown extraordinarily ever since.

      As with most nascent industries, the beginnings of the wind industry in France were not easy. However, thanks to the sound commitment of companies such as La Compagnie du Vent (part of Engie group), who were responsible for installing the first turbine, the industry was able to grow and thrive. By the time La Compagnie du Vent installed France’s first commercial wind farm in 1993, the technology had already advanced considerably, and four V39-500 kW turbines were erected. In only two years, the rotor size of the turbines installed had increased by more than 50% and the power produced by each turbine, more than doubled.

      Maintaining a widespread fleet
      Given local capacity restrictions for individual wind power plants in the French market, wind farms are often limited in size and thus more widely dispersed across the country. With over 20 years of experience in France, Vestas has successfully adjusted its local service business to these conditions.
      The service business expanded its geographical structure in France following the opening of eight service centres in 2013. This new set-up has reinforced Vestas’ position as a leading service solutions provider, allowing a more effective response to our customers’ needs and demands and improving performance. Not only do customers and power production benefit from the service points, the local community benefits too: Jobs are created and wind sector know-how increases through partnerships established with a local high schools.

       

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V25-200 kW

      Installation Date:
      July 1991

      Average MWh Per Year:
      851 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      67.2 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.2 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      93 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Norway 1991

      Two firsts for Vestas in the chilly northern lands of oil, fish and hydro

      Helped along with an abundance of much-desired natural resources, Norway is irrefutably one of Europe’s leading energy nations. Covering the west coast of Scandinavia with a population of little more than five million people, the world’s third biggest exporter of natural gas and an important exporter of oil is also a pioneer in renewable energy sources.

      The petroleum sector remains a cornerstone of the country’s economy, representing some 25% of the gross domestic product, and acting as an important driver for innovation and technology development in other sectors. Indeed, nearly all electric energy generated in Norway derives from hydroelectric power, but with major ambitions to secure the highest share of renewable energy in Europe, Norway has slowly turned to alternatives such as bioenergy and, of course, wind.

       

       

      Wind in the land of the midnight sun
      By the end of 2013, just over 800 MW of wind power had been installed in Norway. Whilst the vast majority of this has focused on onshore wind farms, recent investigations into offshore possibilities are proof that Norway now uses the knowledge and experience from oilfield and maritime operations for future offshore wind power development. Vestas entered the Norwegian market in 1989 with the installation of an individual WinDane WD34-400 kW turbine produced by Dansk Vind Teknik A/S, a Danish manufacturer which would soon after become part of Vestas. The turbine was located on the island of Frøya in Sør-Trøndelag until recently dismantled in 2011.

      Not only did we install the first turbine, but two years later, in 1991, we installed Norway’s first fully-fledged wind farm at Vikna in the district of Namdalen in neighbouring Nord-Trøndelag. Local council-owned utility company Nord-Trøndelag Elektrisitetsverk AS (NTE) was the pioneer of the Vikna project. For the first time, it was no longer just rain that powered local businesses and homes, but also a cold north-west gale or south-west storm that could provide light and warmth to the residents of Nord-Trøndelag. 

      Made up of five wind turbines, the first phase of the project was installed in September 1991 consisting of three 400 kW WD34 turbines. Two more 500 kW V39 turbines were later installed in August 1993, creating a total installed capacity of 2.2 MW, and producing 5.8 GWh annually. That’s enough power to cover about 200 Norwegian household energy needs per year, or nearly 20% of Vikna’s population! The municipality of Vikna has approximately 4,500 inhabitants and covers an area of 318.4 km2, including more than 6,000 islands. The community consists of small villages that live off the sea, and is often subject to the harsh reality of the elements, with average winter temperatures barely breaking freezing point.

      Harnessing the wind when the thermometer drops
      Cold temperatures can complicate life for the locals, and are also sometimes a challenge for wind technology, producing a negative impact on a turbine’s power curve. According to the BTM World Market Update 2012, severe icing can potentially reduce wind turbines’ annual energy production by more than 20%.

      Vestas has spent years learning from data and techniques applied at our wind farms across Scandinavia, Central Europe, and North America, and has developed a range of climate-coping capabilities.

      One of such is the Vestas De-icing™ System for cold climates, a system developed to detect and efficiently remove ice formed on wind turbine blades, whilst maintaining full power production and therefore revenue generation for customers throughout the winter months. The Vestas De-icing™ System can be triggered automatically or manually, offers full control and transparency through a tailored de-icing strategy, and is fully SCADA-integrated.

      In February of 2016, Vestas received an order for 30 V112-3.45 MW and 248 V117-3.45 MW turbines to be used for six wind power plants in Norway with a total capacity of 1,001 MW. This marks the largest wind power project to be built in Europe.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      WD34-400 kW

      Installation Date:
      September 1991

      Average MWh Per Year:
      1,421 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      24 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.3 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      50 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Ireland 1992

      Ireland has spent over twenty years building a wind industry which is now capable of powering approximately 1.2 million homes

      With some of the best wind conditions in Europe, and indeed the world, Ireland has spent over twenty years building a wind industry which is now capable of powering approximately 1.2 million homes. In 2015, wind energy in Ireland accounted for around 24% of electricity demand, with peaks of 50% having been experienced in recent times.

      Wind energy fever hit Ireland in the 1980s when the Department of Energy invested in 13 small-scale projects around the country, but it wasn’t until 1992 that the first commercial wind farm was developed, thus paving the way for a new era in energy and a greener future for Ireland.

      The site of choice was found in County Mayo which had long been identified as perhaps the best wind farm site in Ireland. In spite of its remote location on the island, County Mayo would come to position itself as a key energy hub in Ireland, with an abundance of natural peat resources, and a former thermal energy plant allowing ease of connection for new wind power plants. Additionally, and unbeknownst at the time of installation, the discovery of natural gas reserves 80 km off the coast of the county, and subsequent plans for exploitation, would push the region into the front line of the energy race in Ireland and internationally.

      “Bellacorrick Wind Farm was visionary and a trailblazer for Irish wind energy. It set us off on a path, where today, over twenty years later we have more than 2,350MW installed across the Island, and Ireland is now seen as a European and global leader in terms of the levels of wind energy being delivered onto our national grid, which regularly supplies 50% of our electricity demand,” commented Caitríona Diviney, Chief Operating Officer of the Irish Wind Energy Association (IWEA).

      “Strong and steady winds across Ireland allied with a clear Government focus to position Ireland as a renewable energy champion means that where Bellacorrick led, many more Irish wind farms are following, bringing local jobs and investment to communities across the country. Bellacorrick gave the Irish wind sector its first breath of air.”

      The turbines for the wind farm were supplied by Nordtank Energy Group, a Danish supplier that would later form an integral part of NEG Micon, and subsequently be taken over by Vestas in 2004. Nordtank supplied 21 turbines in total, consisting of 20 NTK 300/31 turbines capable of generating 300 kW, and one 450 kW turbine, together creating a 6.45 MW wind power plant. Given the ideal conditions, Vestas’ customer, has benefited from wind farm availability levels in excess of 95%, as well as annual production of up to 17 million units (MWh) of electricity per year. That’s what we call true business case certainty.

      Since completing the project and as of 31st December 2013, Vestas has installed a total of 32 MW in the County Mayo area, and a total of 603 turbines or 658 MW in the Republic of Ireland.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      NTK 300/31 kW & NTK 450-37 kW

      Installation Date:
      1992

      Average MWh Per Year:
      29,841 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      13,667 tonnes

      Capacity:
      6.45 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      4,124 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      New Zealand 1993

      Wellington wholeheartedly accepts Brooklyn wind turbine as part of the community

      New Zealand has excellent wind resources and around 75% of electricity is supplied through renewable energy sources. The government has set a target of 90% renewable generation by 2025. Of the renewable sources, wind has the greatest potential for New Zealand. The success of the first wind turbine also triggered the policy makers to make wind energy a key part of a safe, clean, and secure electricity system.

      17 years in operation reliably and efficiently
      In 1993, Electricity Corporation of New Zealand agreed with Vestas to build a V27-225 KW on the hills above Wellington in Brooklyn. It was part of a research project to find out how turbines perform in New Zealand. In 1999, Meridian company became the owner of the turbine that generates electricity for 80 New Zealand homes each year. In 2010, after operating for 17 years reliably and efficiently, the turbine went through some mechanical issues, which put it out of action for several months. Meridian asked the residents of Wellington whether they wanted to keep the turbine. The public started a “save the Brooklyn wind turbine” Facebook page and a Dominion Post reader survey showed 85% wanted to repair or replace it.

      In October 2012, Wellington City Council extended the land lease for the Brooklyn turbine. The new lease will cover the life-time of a replacement turbine and allow the option of installing a bigger turbine. Meridian has been talking to the community and stakeholders about this proposal. The application is now being considered by Wellington City Council.

       

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V27-225 kW

      Installation Date:
      March 1993

      Average MWh Per Year:
      1,014 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      152 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.23 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      87 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Australia 1993

      Located on the coast in Western Australia, the isolated town of Esperance remains disconnected to the Australia’s national electricity grid. Before the installation of wind turbines, the electrical needs of Esperance and surrounding districts were supplied solely from a diesel power station. Twenty years ago, Ten Mile Lagoon wind farm became the first commercial-sized wind-farm in Australia, ending the region’s dependence solely on diesel power.

      Equipped with nine Vestas V27-225kw machines working in conjunction with another wind farm and a gas power station, the Ten Mile Lagoon project involved an investment of AUS$5.8 million to develop. At the time of installation, the site had an expected payback period of 12 years. In 1995, the Australian Federal Government announced an excise tax on light fuel oil. This tax doubled the cost of diesel generation in Esperance and effectively halved the payback period for Ten Mile Lagoon, proving how business case certainty provided by wind energy is particularly competitive with other alternatives. In the first five years of operation, the Ten Mile Lagoon wind farm saved about seven million liters of diesel fuel and prevented over 20,000 tons of CO2 from being emitted.

      Wind power integration in isolated grids
      Today, the two wind farms generate about 22% of Esperance's electricity with a maximum instantaneous penetration of just over 65%. Because of wind gusts, wind farm output can vary and, if not controlled correctly, can cause the local electricity supply to fluctuate. To prevent this, computer-control equipment has been installed at both the power station and the individual wind turbines to optimize wind energy production and prevent issues on the grid. Wind power integration in isolated grids has been always a high priority on Vestas’ R&D agenda, leading to a wide array of innovative solutions allowing the development of wind farms in the most diverse conditions. During grid disturbances, our turbines can supply exactly what is needed, matching the grid needs at any specific moment and helping to stabilize the existing imbalances. In cases where wind turbines are operating in isolated systems, Vestas can provide:

      • Detailed studies of wind power plants to determine the controller tuning valid for all possible operating grid conditions (Grid Stability Study)

      • Specially-tuned turbines, if needed, configured at factory and delivered for the specific case

      • A System Integration Study, performed with tuned WTG parameters, to observe high-level responses

       

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V27-225 kW

      Installation Date:
      October 1993

      Average MWh Per Year:
      9,126 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      7,675 tonnes

      Capacity:
      2.03 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      838 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Czech Republic 1993

      The realisable potential of wind energy in Czech Republic is evaluated as 2500 - 2700 MW of installed capacity. The first turbine was installed in Zlinsky region with a capacity of 225 kW. Situated near Hostyn, the turbine is located in one of the most significant touristic sites in the country.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V27-225 kW

      Installation Date:
      November 1993

      Average MWh Per Year:
      900 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      530 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.22 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      167 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Argentina 1994

      Twenty years in beautiful Patagonia with some of the best wind resources in the World


      The region of Patagonia boasts some of the best wind resources throughout the world. Indeed, relentless prevailing winds make it an obvious location for harnessing the power wind carries. This is probably why SCPL, the local cooperative providing electricity to the city of Comodoro Rivadavia in the Southern Argentinian province of Chubut, decided to invest in wind back in 1994, becoming a pioneer, not only in Argentina, but right across South America.

      The first wind farm in Latin America
      In partnership with Micon, which was later acquired by Vestas, the first commercial wind farm in South America came into operation in 1994. Two M530-250 kW turbines were installed, resulting in a total capacity of 500 kW. The project was supported by the Danish Equity Fund, IFU. The electricity produced by these two single turbines rapidly represented up to 1% of the total power supplied to the local community. The huge success of this wind farm made the Cooperative invest in further wind capacity. Eight additional turbines, this time Neg-Micon NM44-750 kW, were added to the wind farm allowing it to generate almost 23,000 MWh/year, supplying clean energy to 7,000 households in Comodoro, nearly 8.5% of total electricity consumption. An impressive capacity factor of 37% was even achieved at an early stage back in 1997.

      A vision becomes reality
      The location could not be more symbolic: Comodoro Rivadavia is not only a place known for its winds; but is also ‘Argentina’s Oil production capital’. Not far from here, 400 km. north of Comodoro, in the city of Rawson, Vestas supplied an additional 43 turbines in 2011. This project was made up of V90-1.8 MW turbines which were twice the rotor diameter and rated power of the NM44, installed nearly 15-years earlier. This 77 MW wind farm further positions this part of Patagonia as one of the areas with the highest potential for wind energy. Argentina's Rawson wind farm, owned by energy firm Genneia (formerly Emgasud) saved the country USD 70.5 million (EUR 53.9m) in fuel imports in its first year of commercial operation. The wind farm, launched in January 2012, supplied over 280 GWh and saved 192,000 tonnes of toxic gas emissions. Its net capacity factor reached 44%.

      Total power plant control - from the ground up
      In order to ensure high capacity factor and flawless operations, a fully integrated SCADA system helps to avoid downtime and reach pre-fixed business results.  VestasOnline® Business not only monitors wind turbines, but also meteorological stations and grid stations. It then delivers online and historical data to a database on site, where data is used to produce detailed reports and measurements, such as:

      • Online production views
      • Event views and alarm notifications
      • Point of common coupling measurements
      • Production reports
      • Performance reports
      • Power curve reports

      VestasOnline® Business works seamlessly with the VestasOnline® Power Plant Controller and can be tailored to the grid code requirements of any country, ensuring compliance for all known grid codes worldwide.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      M530-250 kW

      Installation Date:
      January 1994

      Average MWh Per Year:
      2,260 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      829 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.5 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      636 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Cape Verde 1994

      Partnering with stakeholders in Cape Verde brings wind energy production on a par with global leaders

      The Republic of Cape Verde is an archipelago off the coast of West Africa, with ten inhabited islands and many small islets. With an approximate population of 500,000, Cape Verde’s GDP has grown at an average 4.5% per year over the last 5 years.

      Wind to reduce cost of energy
      Securing the power supply in middle-sized islands like those that compose Cape Verde is generally difficult and expensive as most rely on diesel fuel to power its electricity supply. Generating electricity with diesel is one of the most expensive ways due to the cost of transport and the inefficient size of power plants. This is particularly true for Cape Verde, where refined petroleum used fuel for electricity generation represents approximately 13% of the country’s import costs, and consumer electricity prices are high, around US$ 0.40 per kWh. Though Cape Verde is poor in most natural resources, it is rich in wind with an average speed of 10m/s.

      Wind energy was first introduced in Cape Verde at a commercial scale in 1994. A 2.55 MW wind farm, consisting of NordTank NTK300-31 and NTK150-25 turbines, was installed in the islands of Sal, São Vicente and Santiago. This wind farm supplied nearly 2% of the annual consumption of electricity of the country. In 1997, Nordtank first became part of the merger that lead to the creation of NEG Micon which was afterwards merged with Vestas, transforming it in the indisputable wind leader at a global level.

      On 2009, a more ambitious wind endeavour was envisioned for Cape Verde in order to reduce the imports of fossil fuels while reinforcing the supply of electricity to the country. A special company was created under the name of Cabeólica SA. which takes the form of a private-public partnership owned by Africa Finance Corp., the Finnish Fund for Industrial Corp., InfraCo Ltd., the Government of Cape Verde and Electra, the local water and electricity utility company. Vestas was selected, yet again, as the technology supplier for this pioneering project.

      To guard against uncertainty, the financing of a project often depends on the turbine supplier offering schemes and committed services that add comfort and security during both the construction and operation phases of the project. Banks prefer wind turbine suppliers that have a strong financial platform, as they look at how the supplier will meet potential warranty problems and honour availability guarantees. Vestas can capitalise on its long-standing relationships with banks to help bridge any potential ‘finance gap'. For instance, in the case of multilateral finance, Vestas has a strong track record of working with EKF, the Danish Export Credit Agency, to facilitate insurance cover and finance for wind power projects.

      Vestas’ construction excellence despite challenging logistic conditions
      Thirty V52-850 kW turbines were erected in four different islands for a total capacity of 25.5 megawatts. The 850 kW platform is one of Vestas’ flagships, with a proven track record, especially designed to address the challenges posed by locations such as the Cabeolica wind farm with high wind speeds and a weak electricity grid. It was a challenging logistics operation, as even trucks and cranes needed to be imported for the construction phase. Despite these challenges, the wind farms were operational within only a few months.

      From April 2012 to March 2013, the wind farms generated 64,000 MWh- a substantial 21% of the electricity distributed by Electra on the four islands, around 18% of the total supply to Cape Verde. In some islands, like São Vicente and Sal, the average is even higher, greater than 30%. The true partnership between many different stakeholders allowed Cape Verde to achieve levels of wind energy production similar to world leaders Denmark and Spain in a very short time. Because of this, in 2012, Cabeólica was able to reduce imports by 22,000 tonnes, saving about US$1.8 million.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      NTK 300-31 & NTK 150-25 kW

      Installation Date:
      1994

      Average MWh Per Year:
      11,368 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      5,423 tonnes

      Capacity:
      2.4 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      16,620 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Iran 1994

      Wind energy kicking off in Iran


      It has been estimated that the wind energy potential in Iran is more than 15,000 MW for electricity production. According to the 6th five-year-plan, Iran plans to generate at minimum 7,500 MW of renewable energy by 2030.

       

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      NTK500-37 kW

      Installation Date:
      1994

      Capacity:
      1.0 MW

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Mexico 1994

      The geographical features of the Oaxaca region and its wide coastal plains make it very suitable for the construction of wind farms thanks to its high air density and a substantially flat topography. The potential use of wind as a cost-effective energy has been evident for a long time, considering that this region has annual average wind speeds ranging from 7 to 10.5 m/s at 40 meters height above the ground.

      Advanced siting capabilities are key to increase business case certainty
      In 1994, a pilot project called La Venta enters commercial operation, consisting of 7 Vestas V27 turbines with nominal power of 225 kW. During the first two years of operation, the generation of the wind farm was 12.4 GW, with an overall plant factor of 48.1%. This has avoided the burning of 8,805 oil barrels.

      Mexico can claim some of the areas with best wind conditions worldwide, however taking advantage of these resources is not as easy and straightforward as it might seem. In the continuously growing wind energy market, an increased pressure is put on wind turbine manufacturers to reduce the cost of energy, minimise the risk of failing turbines and provide reliable power plant solutions with optimal potential for intelligent integration with any electrical grid. To achieve these results, siting is of crucial importance in the total cost of energy over the full operating lifecycle of a wind power plant. Siting has to be taken into account when calculating the overall costs of harvesting the wind, including wear and tear on the turbines, and achieving the highest possible return on investment.

      Utilising large data-sets to minimise the risk of unexpected performance
      Once a suitable site location has been chosen, it’s crucial to assess and configure the site to maximise the output and value; the process is based on optimising the relationship between long term operational costs as well as the value of estimated energy production. It gives an accurate and reliable way to identify the most appropriate turbine type and the most suitable positions for individual turbines on the site. Vestas presents a novel and unique method to combine and analyse amounts of meteorological data beyond the limits of market standards. The value of combining large datasets with high performance computing and the track record of more than 75 GW installed worldwide allows to identify the most optimal location and machine for every project, minimising the risk of unexpected performance and the maintenance costs over the entire life-time of the project.

      Expanding wind energy on the Mexican map
      These capabilities in terms of optimal wind data forecast and turbine siting have allowed Vestas to expand the map of wind energy in Mexico to four additional states: Chiapas,Tamaulipas, Jalisco and Baja, California. The Arriaga wind farm, with 16 units of V90-1.8 MW, is not only the first wind farm in Chiapas but also the first power generating facility to go up in the state since the 1950s. In March 2012, it also started the construction at the El Porvenir wind farm, located in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, consisting of 30 Vestas V100-1.8 MW turbines. Mexican retailer Organizacion Soriana will purchase the electricity produced by the wind farm through a long-term power purchase agreement to power 163 stores throughout Mexico.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V27-225 kW

      Installation Date:
      August 1994

      Average MWh Per Year:
      5,070 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      2,307 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.12 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      2,635 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Russia 1995

      Two turbines lower Island's diesel dependence

       

      Wind has been a key element in Russia due to excellent wind conditions in the region. In March 1995, two 250 kW MICON wind turbines were installed on Bering Island, part of the Commander Islands located off the North Eastern coast of Russia. They were connected to the grid in August 1996, helping the island lower its dependence on a diesel-fired power plant located near the main town of Nikolskoye.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      M700-250 kW

      Installation Date:
      March 1995

      Capacity:
      0.5 MW

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      South Korea 1995

      South Korea has potential wind reserves of more than 340 TWh of which close to 100 TWh is onshore and a whopping 243 TWh is offshore.

       

      Wind energy was introduced to South Korea in 1995 with one Vestas turbine of V20-100 kW installed in the island of Jeju in Hangwon. Then in August 1998, two turbines were set up in Hangwon for commercial operation. Since the installation of the first wind turbine, Vestas remains the leading wind turbine supplier in South Korea in terms of installed capacity to date. With 280 turbines installed in the country since 1998, Vestas accounts for 58% of Korea's operating wind capacity.

      In July 2009, South Korea announced its “National Strategy for Green Growth” through 2050, providing a blueprint for how to shift its economic structure away from energy-intensive industries that have driven the majority of the development paths in Asia. The target goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent from a business-as-usual path by 2020, and increase the country’s renewable energy to 10% of the total energy by 2022 through RPS system. Considering the sensitivity of the government to clean energy and sustainability, Vestas offers partnership in providing environmental impact assessments when establishing wind farms. Vestas works closely together with the customers according to Vestas’ contribution to the project.

      The environmental aspects of such an environmental and social assessment typically take into account direct and indirect impacts, including, for instance:

      • Landscape and visual impressions
      • Flora
      • Fauna (e.g. Birds)
      • Noise
      • Shadows

      Wind power plants with Vestas turbines support the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions and development of power plants with less environmental impact. In addition to environmental and social aspects of sustainability, safety is also important in accessing sustainable energy. Vestas works closely together with customers to fulfil the demand for the highest level of safety in its operations as this adds certainty for their business case. Accounting more than half of the installed turbines in South Korea, Vestas support the green growth strategy of South Korea with its sustainable capabilities.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V20-100 kW

      Installation Date:
      1995

      Average MWh Per Year:
      408 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      217 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.1 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      82 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Thailand 1996

      Thailand develops wind power as an alternative to fossil-based energy, reducing imports and boosting energy security

      Located at the centre of Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia, Thailand is the world’s 51st largest country by total area. It is an emerging economy and considered to be a newly industrialized country. Presently, over 80% of the country’s total energy comes from fossil fuels. Thailand plans to increase production of electricity from renewable sources to 20 percent of total output over the next 10 years.

      To reduce imports and boost energy security, Thailand foresees the significance of wind power and develops it into one of alternative energy sources to substitute fossil-based energy. The Ministry of Energy’s Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency, or DEDE, has conducted studies on the potential of wind power since 1975. In 1993, two of 10 kW wind turbines were utilized for a battery charging station. Then, the first wind turbine of Thailand was built as a pilot project of Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). It was installed in July 1996 with Nordtank NTK150/25 wind turbines in Phuket province of Thailand. The small-scale wind farm, connected to the distribution grid, produced 200,000 kWh per year. In 1997, Nordtank first became part of the merger that lead to the creation of NEG Micon which was afterwards merged with Vestas, transforming it into the indisputable wind leader at a global level.

      Competitive selection of turbines
      For low wind sites such as Phuket island, Vestas now offers a product portfolio which covers all the wind classes. With the latest addition of rotor sizes, the 2 MW platform offers a competitive selection of turbines for all segments. The platform’s predictability and tested design ensure lower cost of energy for low, medium and high wind sites, even in extreme weather conditions. As Thailand is a country that experiences generally very low wind speeds, the 2 and 3 MW platforms of Vestas that harvest more wind energy in low to medium wind sites will answer the needs of Thailand for wind energy production.

      By combining turbine technology with experience of grid connections, Vestas can also provide a highly accurate simulation of the wind power plant. This allows Vestas to customise collector network cabling, substation protection and reactive power compensation, all of which boost the cost efficiency of your business and provides certainty that your power plant meets all local requirements.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      NTK 150/25 kW

      Installation Date:
      July 1996

      Average MWh Per Year: 
      200 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      398 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.15 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      409 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Peru 1996

      Initially conceived as a pilot project, Peru's Malabrigo has been labeled a huge success in terms of reliability.

      A pilot project to pioneer wind energy
      Central Eólica Malabrigo was composed of a sole wind turbine generator, a Micon M600 with 250 kW of capacity which was installed back in 1996. This was the first wind turbine above 100 kW ever installed in Peru and also the first one to be connected to the grid. This sole wind turbine, which was initially conceived as a pilot project, has been useful in gathering exceptionally valuable information for the development of wind energy in Peru.

      Peruvian demand for electricity is registering high growth rates. The generation mix is fundamentally based on natural gas and hydroelectric, which is highly dependent on rainfall. Based on the current situation, the government has decided to diversify its energy matrix in order to secure a source of long-term sustainable energy. Wind energy, with approximately 22 GW of potential in the country, offers an excellent opportunity, especially due to its complementarity with hydro.

      Making wind even more predictable
      There are two main challenges that Peru must overcome over the coming years in order to ensure a rapid and smooth growth of wind in its power generation base. The first one is integrating an energy source with incorporation priority into its system, from which availability is variable and distributed throughout remote locations. Knowing how much electricity a wind power plant will produce the next week, day or even hour becomes extremely important to ensure a smooth interaction of wind energy with other generation technologies.

      Vestas Online PowerForecast® combines the analytical depth of Vestas’ repository of on-site wind data, the expertise and experience of our highly skilled specialists, and the processing power of one of the world’s largest commercial computers, to produce accurate power forecasts to strengthen our customers business.

      Vestas’ goal is zero injuries
      The second challenge is represented by the recent development of the wind energy market in Peru, implying the existing need to build critical capabilities such as installation and maintenance services. In addition to the scarcity of services, there is also a lack of qualified project developers, as well as installation and maintenance staff. Vestas works closely together with customers and local stakeholders to fulfil the demand for the highest level of safety in our operations, as this adds certainty for their business case. We also actively join hands with partners across the industry to mitigate general risks and improve training.

      On October 2012, Vestas received yet another order, this time for Peru’s first two wind farms of a commercial scale. Forty five V100-1.8 MW turbines were ordered for the Cupisnique project and seventeen turbines of the same type for the Talara project, both located in the North of Peru. Overall, 114 MW will be installed generating approximately 451,000 MWh, and avoiding 295,450 tons of CO2 emissions when operational as well as an Active Output Management package AOM 4000. The two wind farms are located at a distance above 500 km. which further increases the logistic challenge.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      M600-250 kW

      Installation Date:
      1996

      Average MWh Per Year:
      581 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      168 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.25 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      569 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Jordan 1996

      Wind energy has gained momentum in Jordan since 1996

      Energy security is a prevalent issue in Jordan, a country that lacks the natural resources of its neighbours and has traditionally imported nearly all of its energy and fuel requirements. The Kingdom, however, has witnessed a high growth in energy demand: In the period 2008-2020, annual electricity demand is expected to grow at a rate of 3/4 %. To complement this, the Government of Jordan, in its 2007 Energy Strategy, has set ambitious goals for the development of renewable energies. By 2020, the share of renewable energy in Jordan’s primary energy supply is set to increase from the current 1% to at least 10%, with the installation of wind power to increase from 600 to 1,000 MW.

      3 MW Platform: A reliable and robust platform based on proven technology
      Wind energy is one of the most promising sources of renewable energy in Jordan. The country possesses high-potential wind energy resources. One of these regions is located in the northern part of the country where Jordan’s first turbine above 100 kW is installed. Approximately 92 km north of Amman, in the city of Hofa, Vestas installed 5 units of the V27-225 kW turbine model.

      The wind farm was established in October 1996 in cooperation with the German Government under the so-called Al-Dorado program. The wind farm is connected to the national grid and boasts excellent capacity factors. This is due to the reliability, robustness and efficiency of the turbines, also considered features of other Vestas wind turbines such as the V112-3.0 MW. As part of our flexible product platforms, V112-3.0 MW turbines have a very high capacity factor. Similar to the other 3 MW turbines, the V112-3.3 MW™ IEC IB turbine makes efficient use of its grid compatibility and is an optimal choice for sites with MW constraints. Combining high returns with low risk, the 3 MW platform is an industry favourite with over 9 GW installed since 2015.

      Turn-key projects: Efficiently managing your projects
      The V112-3.0 MW turbine was also the choice for the 117 MW Al-Tafila project, the first utility-scale wind farm to be built in Jordan. As a turn-key project, Vestas was in charge of the full project execution, including the civil and electrical works.

      Vestas is proud to support Jordan’s goal of developing renewable energy at stable and predictable prices, and commits itself to further developing renewable energy in the Middle East and North Africa region.

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V27-225 kW

      Installation Date:
      October 1996

      Average MWh Per Year:
      5,070 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      2,870 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.13 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      1,382 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Luxembourg 1996

      Luxembourg has the highest share of fossil fuels and highest GHG emissions per head among EU countries

       

       

       

       

      Luxembourg is heavily dependent on import of fossil fuel and its products. Domestic efforts to limit CO2 emissions have focused on promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. Wind energy is thus one of the initiatives to diversify energy sources.

       

       

       

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      M1500-500 kW

      Installation Date:
      November 1996

      Capacity:
      2.00 MW

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Jamaica 1996

      Taking all factors into account to reach success under difficult site conditions

      The first commercial wind generator installed in Jamaica dates back to 1996 and it was a Vestas V27 - 225 kW turbine installed at Munro College in the parish of St. Elizabeth. It was only a few years later when in 2004, the first phase of the Wigton wind farm, situated on the southern tip of the Don Figuerero Mountains, was installed.

      No variable is irrelevant in a wind power project
      This wind power project is actually composed of two separate projects. The first one to be installed – or Wigton I as it is referred to – comprises 23 NEG-Micon 900/52 turbines, each with an installed capacity of 900 kilowatts (kW). Wigton II was built in 2010, and consists of 9 Vestas V80 turbines, each with an installed capacity of 2 MW. Their respective capacity factors are 35% and 33%, which means together they generate around 115 gigawatt-hours (GWh) of electricity per year. In total, the wind farm is expected to offset 60,000 barrels of oil per year and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 85,000 tonnes.

      A critical step in determining the success of these 2 projects was considering all the key factors in a wind power project. The site chosen was on an elevated area where the wind from the sea is deflected by the cliff face up to these sites granting more constant diurnal wind pattern and higher wind speeds. Also the interconnection with existing grid was considered in order to minimise costs, resulting in 11.3 km of new transmission line being constructed. In addition, the land on which the wind farm is sited was partly used for mining and reconverted.

      Transport of large components demands innovative solutions
      The Wigton II project had to face logistical challenges related to Jamaica’s roads as they can only accommodate loads of certain sizes. The towers are generally divided in circular section that can be transported relatively easily. However, the nacelles transportation had to be carefully planned through a well-orchestrated process that involved closing down certain portions of main roads in towns where the roads were especially windy. The transportation of certain components also required the construction of a special road that turned off from a main highway and connected to a road used exclusively by bauxite companies for hauling mined ore. Vestas, as main EPC contractor, took extreme care of all the aspects connected to the transport of the equipment. In order to allow the flawless transit of exceptional transports, it is fundamental to conduct a thorough road-survey aimed at identifying key risky areas and put in place an adequate mitigation plan.

      In 2015 a 36 MW order in Jamaica was secured, placed by the U.S.-based project developer BMR Energy. This wind park consists of 11 V112-3.3MW turbines in Saint Elizabeth Parish which will become the largest wind farm in the country. The wind project has an estimated gross annual production of more than 120 GWh, which corresponds to an annual emission saving of 85,400 tons of CO2. Once completed, this wind power plant will provide electricity to approximately 300,000 people in Jamaica.

      Making wind turbines withstand extreme wind conditions
      Due to its geographical location, Jamaica is located in an area particularly prone to hurricanes. During the planning and construction of Wigton, Vestas had to capitalise on its long experience in working with very different climatic conditions implementing solutions that allowed the wind farm to survive through several hurricanes with minimal damages. Working in challenging climatic conditions demands solutions capable of granting business case certainty and sustainable operation of the power plant, such as:

      • Construction standards had to be appropriate, choosing turbine model adaptable to the tropical climate and able to withstanding extreme wind conditions
      • Additional cooling equipment needs to be installed, especially a heat exchanger for gear oil cooling plus additional oil cooling radiator with fan
      • A management system for hurricane warning is necessary to be implemented, together with a special disaster mitigation and response plan

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      V27-225 kW

      Installation Date:
      December 1996

      Average MWh Per Year:
      1,014 MWh

      CO2 Saved Per Year:
      721 tonnes

      Capacity:
      0.225 MW

      Average Household Needs Covered:
      653 households

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      Sri Lanka 1999

      The ancient Sinhalese used monsoon winds to power furnaces as early as 300 BC, making Sri Lanka one of the first countries in the world to take advantage of the wind in this way.

       

       

      Its first modern-day wind farm was installed in 1999 in Hambantota on the south-eastern coast of the country, and consists of five 600 kW NEG Micon M1500-600 turbines with a total installed capacity of 3 MW.

       

      Turbine Facts

      Model:
      NM43-600 kW

      Installation Date:
      October 1999

      Capacity:
      3.0 MW

      Disclaimer:
      AEP figures are indicative only.

      2000-2009

       

      Discover the markets we have pioneered over the years from 2000 until 2009.

        Close

        Morocco 2000

        Aiming for 42% renewables in its energy mix by 2020, Morocco drives forward plans to connect 2GW of wind power

        Morocco is one of the largest potential markets for renewable energy across the MENA region. The country is targeting sufficient renewable energy to account for 42% of its energy generation mix by 2020, driving forward plans to have 2 GW of wind-power capacity online.

         

        CO2 emissions requiring the plantation of over 12 million trees to be offset avoided

        During August 2000, Vestas completed the installation of the first wind-farm in Morocco. The ambitious project involved the installation of 84 units of V42-600 kW for a total of 50.4 MW. Morocco State-owned utility ONE committed itself to buy all power produced by this wind farm within a period of 19 years.

        Maximising energy production and environment protection

        The construction of projects in remote and mountainous areas such as Koudia al Baida is particularly challenging and requires high level of expertise in order to ensure a successful on time completion. The most critical step in the installation of a wind power project is the planning of the different activities involved. Despite differences in turbine design and size, most wind farms demand high levels of attention on key elements such as access roads, underground conduits, crane pads and foundations.

        Complex terrains demand high construction expertise

        At Koudia al Baida, the site layout has been designed to optimise the capture of wind energy while minimising the impact on the environment. Indeed, the 84 turbines are divided into 3, separated by a few hundred meters to create pathways for migratory bird groups. The environmental performance of a wind power plant is site and layout specific and varies across the globe according to local site performance and manufacturing supply chain. Vestas capabilities in terms of Life Cycle Assessment provide the different stakeholders with transparent and assured environmental facts (such as carbon footprint, return on-energy, water-use or environmental benefits, etc.) specific to the plant. These fact-based indicators increase business case certainty by supporting the customer’s energy strategy (energy case, power plant benefits, index ratings) and supports the project planning / permitting process (decommissioning plan, public acceptance, consultation and response).

         

         

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V42-600 kW

        Installation Date:
        August 2000

        Average MWh Per Year:
        210,168 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        150,900 tonnes

        Capacity:
        50.4 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        201,310 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Taiwan 2000

        Using quality technology to forerun the diversification of Taiwanese energy

        Centuries ago, Portuguese sailors sighted the main island of Taiwan and recorded it as Ilha Formosa, or "Beautiful Island", positioning it on European maps for the first time. Today, we place Taiwan on the map once again as we celebrate the installation of its first turbine in the year 2000.

        During the second half of the 20th century, the “Taiwan miracle” brought rapid economic growth and industrialisation. As a result, Taiwan has become the 19th largest economy of the world and its high-tech industry plays a major role in the global economy. These economic developments have paved the way for Taiwan to achieve a balance among economic development, energy security and environmental protection. The fact that almost all (98%) energy is imported to Taiwan means renewable energy development can diversify the energy supply, increasing domestic contribution whilst simultaneously developing the local industry. Therefore, on 22nd March 2000, the Ministry of Economic Affairs issued a range of “Wind Power Demonstration System Equipment Subsidies” to promote wind power usage and increase the supply of domestic renewable energy.

        Delivering Taiwan’s innovative solution

        With abundant wind resources along the west coast and offshore, Taiwan is a paradise of opportunity for developing wind energy. A key advantage of this region is its ease of access for transportation, with excellent road, rail and sea connections, such as the harbour and infrastructure linked to the Formosa Mai-Liao oil refinery.

        At Vestas, we are experts in excellent transportation. To get our customers’ investments off to a flying start, we know this means delivering products on time and at the expected high quality. Our long-term supply partnerships and customised transport equipment mean you can have confidence in Vestas to give you what you need, when you need it, at a competitive price and without compromising quality or safety.

        Using trusted technology to pioneer a new market

        In 2000, Vestas snapped up the prospect to install Taiwan’s first wind turbines, provided for under the subsidies announced by the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The Mai-Liao Wind Power Demonstration System is located in Mai-Liao Industrial Park on the western coast of Taiwan. Situated alongside the windbreak in the northeast part of the Industrial Park, the wind farm is equipped with four units of V47-660KW wind turbines with a capacity of 2.64 MWs. With its distinct location, the wind farm can produce a total of over 6 million kilowatts per year.

        A genuine innovation when launched in 1997, the V47-660 kW, with its futuristic design and innovative technology, became a model for the giant turbines that have since begun to roll off the production lines. Exploiting the power of the wind reliably and efficiently, the V47 could be considered the epitome of Vestas’ stringent manufacturing rules and processes. With manufacturing quality and proven performance on our side, we can guarantee our turbines are made following strict and standardised processes, are delivered on time, every time, and live up to the highest performance standards for their entire 20-year design specification.

        The benchmark of a future industry

        The success of Mai-Liao Wind Power Demonstration System established an important milestone in developing the wind power industry in Taiwan. Since its commissioning, the government of Taiwan has launched a plan to construct 450 onshore wind turbines and 600 offshore wind turbines by 2030, aiming at a capacity of 4200 MW, amongst which 1.2 GW for on-shore and 3GW for offshore wind.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V47-660 kW

        Installation Date:
        November 2000

        Average MWh Per Year:
        11,948 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        7,456 tonnes

        Capacity:
        2.64 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        1,537 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Chile 2001

        It's all in the execution: Construction expertise is the key to successful completion

        Strong, reliable winds in Patagonia offer a very attractive potential for wind power growth. Even if complex terrain and distance from major load centres might represent a challenge, wind energy still represents a valid alternative to fossil generation and a good ally to other renewable energy sources.

         

        Wind is able to ensure energy security

        On the tip of South America, the relatively narrow landmass separating the Atlantic and Pacific oceans creates very favourable wind conditions. Unlike many of its neighbors, Chile has limited indigenous fossil energy resources and still imports roughly 60% of its energy needs. This dependence on imported fossil fuels has created periods of electricity shortage over the past decade; in addition, Chile is also vulnerable to long dry spells during the summer. As a result, electricity prices in Chile are among the highest in Latin America and higher than the OECD average. Fortunately, Chile is blessed with other renewable energy resources, including wind, solar and geothermal power, that to date, represent slightly above 1% of the energy mix.

        Wind power and hydro working jointly to cater the local energy needs

        The first wind farm was installed in Chile in 2001, in Aysén, in the far south, and for a number of years, this was the only wind farm operating in the country. The 2 MW Alto Baguales project is composed by 3 units of V47-660 kW and supplies approximately 6% of the local power needs with the highest instantaneous penetration of 22% of the total demand. These turbines generate approximately 6.5 GWh of electricity per year saving 1.5 million litres of diesel per year, thus meeting the energy demands of the region without sacrificing its environmental commitment. Replacing the old diesel generator with a wind farm boasting an average capacity factor over 50% and a hydro plant to cover the base load, allowed Coihaique to cover its energy needs in a cost-efficient and sustainable way.

        Careful planning is the key for a successful project completion

        The main challenges of the project were connected to two critical aspects in the development of wind energy projects. The transportation of the equipment to a remote region, which demands strong expertise on road surveys, planning and risk mitigation. For instance, during 2013 Vestas cooperated with the Chilean authorities in order to modify the transportation rules and allow multiple batches of exceptional transport on the Chilean roads. In addition, obtaining the proper installation equipment in markets where wind energy is at initial stage could represent a significant risk factor in the successful completion of a project. In the case of the Alto Baguales wind farm, this resulted in a 330 tons crane that had to be brought over the mountains from Buenos Aires. In addition, the strong winds present on site demanded a careful planning of the turbines erection at 5 a.m. to take advantage of lower wind speeds.

         

         

         

        Large industrial players using wind to secure their cost of energy

        In 2010, Vestas also participated in the first wind power project providing power directly to an industrial installation. The first was the 2.3 MW Cabo Negro wind farm, which was installed in the region of Magallanes in Southern Chile by the Canadian methanol producer Methanex in order to boost production at its methanol plants and reducing its exposure to increasing natural gas prices. Vestas’ strong track-record and expertise resulted in a fast ramp-up time for the project that took just 15 months from groundbreaking to production of the first megawatt hour, ensuring Methanex estimated energy costs 22% below the regulated market price in the region.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V47-660 kW

        Installation Date:
        November 2001

        Average MWh Per Year:
        8,961 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        3,674 tonnes

        Capacity:
        1.98 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        4,051 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Slovakia 2003

        Exceeding expectations and reaping new benefits

        The first wind park of Slovakia is located on the Vápenková rock, above Cerová village, on the side called Rozbehy. The wind farm consists of four Vestas V47-660 kW turbines which were constructed in 2002-2003 and commissioned in October 2003. Since its completion, the wind farm has exceeded original performance expectations, and helps attract approximately 200-300 tourists to Cerová every day.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V47-660 kW

        Installation Date:
        October 2003

        Average MWh Per Year:
        11,948 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        2,354 tonnes

        Capacity:
        2.64 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        2,886 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        United Arab Emirates 2004

        Abu Dhabi's sustainability strategy aims to generate 7% renewable energy by 2020

         

         

         

         

        In 2004, Vestas installed the first turbine of the Middle East on Sir Bani Yas Island. The turbine served for the purpose of making the Sir Bani Yas Island an eco-project.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V52-850 kW

        Installation Date:
        September 2004

        Average MWh Per Year:
        3,785 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        2,263 tonnes

        Capacity:
        0.85 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        298 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Croatia 2004

        Bora creates excellent wind conditions on the islands and along the Croatian coast

        Ravne 1 Wind Farm was installed with 7 units of V52-850 kW turbines. The wind turbines are situated on a plateau at a sea level of 180 m., benefiting from the excellent wind resources. After one year of experience in operating wind farm Ravne I, the existence of excellent will conditions led to the decision of extending the wind farm.

         

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V52-850 kW

        Installation Date:
        December 2004

        Average MWh Per Year:
        26,495 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        6,253 tonnes

        Capacity:
        5.95 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        4,478 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Philippines 2005

        Turbines rise directly from the sand, just a few metres away from the sea in Bangui Bay

        Installed in 2005, phase I of the NorthWind Bangui Bay project became the first commercial wind farm in Philippines and the first of its kind in South Eastern Asia. Located in the northern Luzon’s Ilocos Norte Province, the wind farm rises directly from the sand a few meters away from the sea and it is perfectly visible from the surrounding landscape.

         

        First project in Emissions Reduction Purchase Agreement under the Clean Development Mechanism

        Completed in 2008, the wind farm is composed of twenty V82-1.65 MW turbines adding up to a total capacity of 33 MW that can potentially supply nearly 40% of the needs of the local utility, Ilocos Norte Electric Cooperative. It is estimated that the power generated by the wind farm provides electricity for more than 100,000 households.

        Developed by the NorthWind Power Development Corporation (NWPDC), later to be partially acquired by the Ayala Corporation, a well-known conglomerate in the Philippines, it was also the first project in the Philippines to be part of the Emissions Reduction Purchase Agreement (ERPA) under the Clean Development Mechanism. It was also the first Philippine company to receive Carbon Emission Reduction Certificates (CERs) from the Executive Board of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

        Wind turbines as a main tourist attraction for the region

        There is yet another important characteristic of the project which is neither technical nor commercial. Unlike the neighbouring areas famous for historical monuments, religious sites and beaches fit for surfing, Bangui was not a main tourist destination in IIocos. However, after the installation of the wind farm, the turbines rapidly became a major tourist attraction for the region. Today, it is relatively easy to buy souvenirs such as postcards, t-shirts or small replicas of the wind turbines and tour guides help tourists gather additional information about wind energy and wind turbines. Beautiful photos taken by the visitors to Bangui depict how well-integrated the wind turbines are with the landscape.

        Local farmers have also benefitted from the installation of the wind farms with sales from the number of visitors. The first wind farm in the Philippines is a perfect example of how spill-over effects from wind energy are shared with the local population.

        The successful acceptance of a wind power project also depends on a thorough evaluation of the different variables that impact the environmental performance of the power plant. That is why Vestas can support customers using its comprehensive knowledge to analyse how the plant performs for the site operating conditions against key performance indicators, such as:

        • Carbon footprint - grams of CO2-equivalents per kWh
        • Turbine recyclability - % mass of turbine
        • Return-on energy - months payback or number times paid back

        • Material breakdown - mass of various materials in turbine or entire power plant
        • Water-use - grams of water per kWh
        • Environmental savings, for example, from recycling, repowering, or SF6 take-back at end-of-life
        • Other potential impact indicators

        EPC (Turnkey) contract introduced to Philippines

        Continuing with its commitment to the Philippines, in 2013 Vestas announced an additional 87 MW order in the country to deliver a wind farm under an EPC (turnkey) contract in Burgos, also in the Ilocos Norte province. To win this order, Vestas designed a project solution which draws on the strengths derived from Vestas’ broad regional presence. The Burgos wind power plant will produce around 233,000 MWh helping the Philippines realize its national renewable energy targets.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V82-1.65 MW

        Installation Date:
        May 2005

        Average MWh Per Year:
        105,120 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        50,563 tonnes

        Capacity: 
        33 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        133,401 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Azerbaijan 2009

        Optimum siting capabilities allow the development of the first large-scale wind power plant in Azerbaijan

        Azerbaijan has good renewable energy resources. The wind, which blows more than 250 days per year and may generate 2.4 billion kWh of electricity annually, is the country’s preferred option because of its lower cost, environmental soundness and unlimited availability.

        Caspian Technologies Company (CTC) first introduced large scale wind power to Azerbaijan in 2008. The company installed two Vestas V52 turbines with a capacity of 850 kW at the Pilot Project in Yeni Yashma, 50 km north of Baku on the Caspian Sea.

        Proper Site Selection and Grid Compliance: Vestas Power Plant Solutions

        The Pilot Project is located at a geographically favourable place from an infrastructural aspect. Choosing the right location plays an integral part in the successful development of a project. Vestas’ Power Plant Solutions are therefore very crucial for proper site selection and grid compliance.

        SiteHunt®, SiteDesign® and Electrical PreDesign allow our customers to plan ahead for building successful projects. SiteDesign® optimises the layout of the wind power farm through a sophisticated analysis of lifetime energy costs for each turbine. Vestas’ SiteDesign® then enables you to assess the production and operating costs of a complex wind energy site over the long term, and configure the optimal location and operational strategy of individual turbines accordingly.

        Choosing the most efficient layout for the turbines and sustaining the effective grid compliance led to a boost in the cost of energy for the project. Pilot Project now has a 35 KV grid connection, providing constant transfer of green energy. From May 2009 until 2010, the project produced approximately 6 million KWh wind energy. Thanks to thorough planning, there were no physical impediments or issues with the proximity to the grid connection, highways and railway networks. Because of this, the project was able to be completed in a very short period of eight months. This project also demonstrates that wind has the shortest ramp-up time from 2 to 5 years when compared to other renewable energy sources.

        Active Output Management: Predictability and Strengthened Business Case Certainty

        Not only the most optimum layout and robust turbines but also after-sales solutions are very crucial for a high return of investment for wind power plants. Our Active Output Management® service programme, or AOM in short, ensures the highest possible output at all times, so your return on investment is achievable and more secure. With our complete range of AOM options, Vestas has the capability to achieve maximum performance from your turbines, every day throughout the entire lifetime of your wind power plant.

        Supporting knowledge sharing of wind power technologies

        Since the installation of the two Vestas V52 turbines, the government has added additional resources in its State program dedicated to diversification of energy sources. Michael Nosiadek, a member of the managing board of the Baku-based German-Azerbaijani Economic Foundation (DAWF), states “Education and knowledge are key. Not only can education develop this special sector in the right direction, it can also create new jobs and a cleaner environment.”

        With 30 years of expertise, willpower and passion, Vestas is able to support these initiatives. Since Azerbaijan has set the goal of increasing the share of renewable energy to 9.7% by 2020, knowledge sharing of wind power technologies has become much more valuable. In 2009, a V39-500 KW was erected by CTC for training and information sharing throughout the community.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V52-850 kW

        Installation Date:
        March 2009

        Average MWh Per Year:
        7,570 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        3,323 tonnes

        Capacity:
        1.7 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        2,934 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        Aruba 2009

        After a short time, Vader Piet wind farm has become an Aruban landmark

        Located in the Caribbean Sea a few kilometers north of Venezuela, Aruba is home to pristine beaches, warm waters and average temperature of 27 °C (81 °F). It’s no wonder this small nation is nicknamed “One Happy Island.”

        However, all islands have a few drawbacks when it comes to the supply of some basic needs. Contrary to what one might think, rainfall in Aruba is not abundant and the island does not have a natural source of fresh water. To supply the permanent population of 100,000 people plus its 700,000 annual visitors with fresh water, sea water must be desalinated and distributed across the island – a process that requires large amounts of electricity. This is why electricity and water in Aruba are managed by the same organisation: the Water and Electricity Board of Aruba W.E.B Aruba.

         

         

         

        Aruba’s Goal to Become 100% Renewable

        Until recently, the Water and Electricity Board of Aruba (W.E.B. Aruba) needed to import 100% of the fuel it used to produce electricity, mostly in the form of oil. This meant that on top of having to pay for one of the most expensive ways to produce electricity, the country was vulnerable to the volatility of oil prices. In order to offset these risks, Aruba embarked on a sustainability strategy which included the goal of becoming 100% renewable by the year 2020.

        Vader Piet fully integrates into the landscape

        Luckily, Aruba is abundant in wind. As part of the strategy to diversify the sources of energy, the Vader Piet wind farm, Aruba’s first, and so far only, wind farm was installed in 2009. The Vader Piet project included the installation of ten Vestas V90-3.0 MW turbines. The V90-3.0 is a robust turbine designed for the high winds that blow across Aruba making it ideal for the island. In addition, its advanced control of reactive power capability stabilizes frequency and voltage of the grid, which is necessary for small-sized grids. It is also very easily transportable, virtually compliant with any site at global level. It consumes very little water during manufacturing of the components and no water once the site is up and running.

        Integration in the local environment

        The wind park is located adjacent to the entrance to the Arikok National Park, and as such, it was a requirement of the environmental impact assessment to build a grid connection with underground cabling only. It was finally decided to position the substation in the centre of the wind park. All cabling is underground, even the high voltage grid connection to the next substation of the island’s grid operator ELMAR. As a result, the wind park has a minimum visual impact and looks integrated into the landscape.

         

        Vestas strives to continually improve people’s lives through having a responsible interaction with the environment, respect for society and a productive economy. To make that goal a reality Vestas works with Life Cycle Assessments to develop increasingly energy-efficient products and production whilst mitigating the environmental impacts throughout the turbine's lifetime.

        Since 1999, Vestas has been developing Life Cycle Assessments of wind power to give a ‘cradle to grave’ evaluation of the environmental impacts of Vestas’ products and activities. These concentrate on two key actions.

        • Document the environmental performance of Vestas wind turbines
        • Analyse the results to improve or develop wind turbines with less environmental impact

        Since its installation, Vader Piet wind farm has supplied 18% of Aruba’s energy needs with W.E.B Aruba as its sole off-taker.

        Thanks to the Vader Piet wind farm, Aruba now tops the list of countries that generate electricity from wind.

        Turbine Facts

        Model:
        V90-3.0 MW

        Installation Date:
        December 2009

        Average MWh Per Year:
        125,600 MWh

        CO2 Saved Per Year:
        23,549 tonnes

        Capacity:
        30 MW

        Average Household Needs Covered:
        56,833 households

        Disclaimer:
        AEP figures are indicative only.

        2010-2020

        Discover the markets we have pioneered since 2010 and follow along as we continue to pioneer new markets.

          Close

          Cyprus 2010

          The strategic location of the island of Cyprus has been a major factor in shaping its development into a major eastern Mediterranean trading post as well as a reputable international business and services centre. However, in energy terms, being an island is always a complicated matter. Cyprus has no connection to another country’s electricity grid; therefore, energy demand is met almost exclusively through the consumption of imported oil products.

           

          In 2011, the cost of energy supply for Cyprus represented 25% of the cost of total imports for the country. Given the soaring costs of electricity for consumers, increasing climate concerns and ever-rising oil prices, Cyprus’ government decided to integrate new energy sources into its state policies.

          Cyprus announced renewable energy targets as part of the National Action Plan (NAP) issued by the Ministry of Energy, Industry, Commerce and Tourism. The objective is to reach the minimum capacity of 584 MW by 2020, which will be equal to 16% of the total electricity production capacity in Cyprus and 3% higher than the target set by the EU.

          The liberalization of electricity power generation contributed to the development of the business environment for renewable energy sources. The private sector supported the government targets and initiated the birth of the first wind park on the island; moving Cyprus closer to reaching its renewable energy target by 2020.

          New technology to harness low-to-medium wind sites

          The first wind farm in Orites, near Paphos, was installed in 2010 and comprised 41 Vestas V90-2.0 MW turbines. The wind power plant, owned by D.K Wind Supply, developed by Akis Ellinas and operated by Platina Finance, has an installed capacity of 82 MW. Even though Cyprus is not among the windiest areas in the world, the new technology offered by Vestas helped to harness the wind energy at a low-to-medium wind site and turn it into revenue. Thanks to Vestas’ service program and the high level availability of V90-2.0 MW turbines, the business case of this investment was ensured.

          The success of the V90-2.0 MW turbines has led the 2 MW platform to be considered for other wind farms in Cyprus. The Koshi wind farm and Agia Anna wind farm also take advantage of a product built on the proven technology of the 2MW platform by utilizing the V100-1.8 MW turbines designed for low wind sites.

          EIB Financing of Orites wind project to win the Award

          Financing for Orites project was secured by British company Platina Partners, with the European Investment Bank providing 50% of the loan under a conventional project finance structure. The cost-effective technologies, high quality products, and first-class services throughout the value chain were the main pillars behind the business case certainty of the project. 

          The EIB financing of the Orites project was one of the elements that led Euromoney to award the “Lender of the Year” title to the EIB. It also serves as an important example of project lending in a difficult financial climate showing trust in Vestas’ technologies with an emphasis on reliability, consistency and predictability.

          Turbine Facts

          Model:
          V90-2.0 MW

          Installation Date:
          August 2010

          Average MWh Per Year:
          358,463 MWh

          CO2 Saved Per Year:
          249,849 tonnes

          Capacity:
          82 MW

          Average Household Needs Covered:
          33,283 households

          Disclaimer:
          AEP figures are indicative only.

          Dominican Republic 2011

          October the 11th is a date highlighted in the calendar of all Dominican Republic inhabitants. It is not Independence Day, nor is it the birthdate of one of their forefathers, but something much smaller and certainly much more recent in time. It is also something Dominicans are proud of: since 2011, the country comes together to celebrate ‘The Day of the Dominican Winds’, the day the first wind farm of the Dominican Republic was inaugurated.

          Juancho Los Cocos: The first large-scale renewable energy initiative

          Juancho Los Cocos wind farm is composed of 14 Vestas V90-1.8 MW turbines. Just down the road, the Quilvio Cabrera wind farm, made up of five V82-1.65 MW, provides a total aggregated capacity of 33.45 MW capable of producing 220,000 MWh, and avoiding the emission of 200,000 tons of CO2. The wind farm, located in the Southern Province of Pedernales, is not only the first wind farm but also Dominican Republic’s first large-scale renewable initiative. EGE Haina is the owner of Juancho Los Cocos wind farm, and also the largest producer of electricity belonging to the Dominican Republic’s interconnected system. It was only because of EGE Haina’s firm decision, and a wide collaboration between a significant number of companies, that the dream to bring wind energy to the country came true.

          Vestas was chosen as the technology supplier for the project because of its product offerings, which allowed harnessing the most power given the conditions of the site, and its experience in the Caribbean. To support operations at high temperatures typical of this region, Vestas introduced at the time a CoolerTop™ on its nacelles that uses the wind’s own energy to generate the cooling required, rather than consuming energy generated elsewhere. The absence of any electrical components ensures that the cooling system makes no noise and reduces the nacelle’s energy consumption.

          A tale of complex construction

          Vestas’ track-record and global expertise were extremely important in this project, as the construction of the wind farm was a genuine challenge for the Dominican Republic. Forty five metre-long blades, towers as high as 80 metres, and nacelles weighting many tonnes, represented a logistical test for EGE Haina. For example, the wind farm required the use of a crane that could lift up to 12,500 tonnes, five times larger than any other crane ever used in the country. Additionally, in order to offload the wind turbines from the ship that transported them, Cabo Rojo harbour needed to be adapted by enlarging the ramp and constructing a special storage area.

          Wind energy and integration with local communities

          EGE Haina chose the name Los Cocos in order to reflect the nature of the area and a symbol of eco-tourism. This is not only anecdotic, but something that should be highlighted as it represents a deeper meaning for the local community. Throughout the whole development of the wind farm, these communities were placed at the top of the priority list. Not only did the wind farm not represent any type of inconvenience for local inhabitants, but it triggered educational, social and economic opportunities in one of the country’s poorest provinces.

          In 2011, Juancho Los Cocos put the Dominican Republic on the world wind energy map by receiving the installation of the first wind farm in the country, using Vestas turbines.

          Since 2011, Vestas has installed 3 wind farms in the Dominican Republic: Los Cocos (25 MW), Quilvio Cabrera (8 MW) and Larimar (49 MW), 82 MW in total. Larimar was the most recent project to be completed, and was connected to the grid in March 2016.

          Turbine Facts

          Model:
          V90-1.8 MW

          Installation Date:
          July 2011

          Average MWh Per Year:
          115,584 MWh

          CO2 Saved Per Year:
          68,079 tonnes

          Capacity:
          25.5 MW

          Average Household Needs Covered:
          63,858 households

          Disclaimer:
          AEP figures are indicative only.

          Guatemala 2014

          In 2014, vestas received an order for the first wind farm ever built in Guatemala in the department of Guatemala, Republic of Guatemala, placed by Centrans Group and Victoria Corp., dedicated to the development of renewable energy projects in Central America.The agreement comprised sixteen V112-3.3 MW turbines for the San Antonio wind power plant.

          VestasOnline® Business SCADA solution was  included as part of the scope of the project: this solution helps avoiding downtime and reach production and business goals and is backed by 30 years of Vestas’ wind power experience.

          In addition, a ten-year Active Management Output (AOM) 5000 service agreement was also included. Vestas AOM 5000 service agreements ensure maximized output, as well as shared incentives in the form of an energy-based availability guarantee that aligns service and maintenance operations with low wind periods.

           

          The San Antonio wind power plant has an estimated annual production of 150,000 MWh, which save the environment from over 40,000 tons of CO2 emissions on an annual basis, providing Guatemala with enough electricity to cover the residential electricity consumption of more than 178,000 households. As of 2016, 65% of Guatemala’s grid was based on renewables.

          Turbine Facts

          Model:
          V112-3.3 MW

          Installation Date:
          September 2015

          Average MWh Per Year:
          150,000 MWh

          CO2 Saved Per Year:
          40,000 tonnes

          Capacity:
          52.8 MW

          Average Household Needs Covered:
          178,000 households

          Disclaimer:
          AEP figures are indicative only.

          Serbia 2015

          Serbia began tackling its goal of reaching 500 MW of wind capacity, or 27% of total capacity, by 2020 with the Kula wind farm, constructed in the province of Vojvodina.

           

          The project, consisting of three Vestas V117 3.3 MW turbines, was developed by MK Fintel Wind Group, a joint venture between Italy’s Fintel Energia Group, holding 46 percent and Serbian conglomerate MK Group, holding 54 percent. The Energy Minister of Serbia, Aleksander Antic attended the inauguration of the Kula wind farm, celebrating the first wind park to be constructed in Serbia.  

          Serbia is known to have low to medium wind resources, with some of the higher wind speeds experienced in the province of Vojvodina. The 3 MW platform of Vestas optimizes performance in a variety of wind sites, including low to medium wind sites, as well as high wind sites and turbulent sites, answering to the varying needs of projects.

          Turbine Facts

          Model:
          V117-3.3 MW

          Installation Date:
          November 2015

          Average MWh Per Year:
          270,000 MWh

          Capacity:
          10 MW

          Average Household Needs Covered:
          8,000 households

          Disclaimer:
          AEP figures are indicative only.